The Police Sculptures

The police I grew up with involved illustrations of police in my grade school textbooks rescuing kittens, directing traffic, being in general beneficial support persons for our wider society.  In my community, across the continent, I suspect there are still representatives of these police.  What images I mostly see today though are of a militarized force sent out to confront some mass at demonstration.  I still prefer the cat rescuer illustrations.  PIECE 1) A Cultural Bygone.  Wood, badge, stuffed cat.  PIECE 2) Traffic Duty.  Cardboard shipping tubes, wood, badge.  – JM

Painting smoke

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I started painting smoke last summer, and approached the concept a few times more this summer.  This piece, The Rebecca Ward Goes Down, symbolically describes wooden ships that were frozen in place, and ultimately crushed by the ice, as early explorers (such as Robert Peary and crew) attempted to reach the top of the world.

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Latex paint and ink on medium density fiberboard, framed in oak, maple and walnut.

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These photographs are from a temporary outdoor exhibit I posted on the exterior wall of an abandoned concrete facility at the end of July.  Plenty of neighborhood people passed by and enjoyed the art…  – JM

Campaign Cycles

I’m continuing to work on Unfoldables – they are made by arranging and gluing 16 photocopies onto single, large sheets of paper.  Certain areas are then painted.  Here I’m exploring an antithesis to the avalanche of campaigning that will undoubtedly inundate our lives through late 2016.  – JM

Previous paintings

I recently traveled back in time, via an external hard drive, and found forgotten caches of old work (in the form of digital images).  These 3 paintings are Eur’s and the first 2 were completed before we met.  She used thickener to build surfaces onto the canvas so that you could run your hand over the finished pieces and they felt like topographical maps.  – JM

3.  Shell 4.  Green Dragonflies 5.  Blue Dragonflies

How to illegally hang your work in Detroit

Actually, I don’t know if it’s illegal.  Detroit is a public-communications headquarters.  In the barren and even the not-so-barren places, hundreds of people seem to always be saying, “I’m here.”

Diego’s industrial people – Rivera Court, Detroit Institute of Arts

We saw the Diego and Frida exhibit at Detroit’s DIA.  For two educationally rich hours I got to study Rivera’s canvases and charcoal studies.  Everything had to be committed to memory as there was no photography – not even sketching – allowed in the exhibit, so I kept my nose as close to his works as the environment would allow.  Then we exited through the gift shop and wandered a course to Rivera Court – where Diego’s bigger than life Detroit Industry fresco exists.  It’s flooring.  If you admire even one single thing about large works on walls, then you must make it a point in your life to see Rivera Court (I felt similar awe seeing the Lincoln Monument at night a few years ago).  Rivera Court is not a place for photography – capturing it is not possible.  We stayed in the court for over an hour and visited it again before leaving the museum, being there compressed by our individual responses to such an artistically overwhelming place.  I love to look for the artist at work whenever I see work in person, and I found Diego’s pencil lines apparent everywhere in the muted industrial storyboards visible at eye level (images inspired by what Rivera observed at Ford’s River Rouge Complex).  Capturing the small images shown here was the only effective way I could capture any of Rivera Court.  It’s given me new artistic material to reflect upon when creating my own work.  – JM

3 Diegos for Detroit

3 unfoldable Diego’s.  Going with us to Detroit.  We’re bringing and leaving 21 unfoldables in all.  I hope people who get the unfoldables will be inspired to hang, photograph, and email.  The unfoldables break bread at the table of modern art.  – JM

Diego for Detroit

This is the second (of 3) Diego unfoldables I finished.  It’s going to Detroit when we see the Diego and Frida show at the Detroit Institute of Art.  Eur and I will hide the mailers with our Diego and Frida unfoldables around the city as we participate in Detroit’s “Free Art Friday” scavenger hunt, which we learned about after the Detroit Institute of Art declined, due to policy reasons, our request to unfold and hang our Diego and Frida pieces in the Institute’s break room.  – JM

Golden Whales – #1, #2

I’m staying the course with this series and with my exploration into the concept of mailable, unfoldable art, although I seem to be the only one in the world who recognizes the potential here.  The Golden Whale is the second of four pieces in the America series – mailable, unfoldable artworks.  – JM