Thanks Joe! (post 5 of 5)

“Solid documentation of art you hold dear seems important.  Joe’s been working on a series of “unfoldables” and he used the process to create five pieces of unfoldable art documenting Love After Homicide, the Millennium Park art installation I completed with my students.  Presented here are photographs of Joe explaining unfoldables and shots of the five documentary pieces he created.  Thanks Joe!”  – EM

And the Public Participates (post 3 of 5).

“This 48 image post is an online gallery of people interacting with Love After Homicide and taking the memorial rocks.  Also included is a hug from an inspired visitor, a retired policeman from London, and a visit from park security (we never asked for permission, rather we just showed up and installed our work near Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate).  We not only presented memorials for those who were recently murdered in Chicago; we also encouraged people to think about the need to reduce the large numbers of deaths inflicted by members of our species on other members of our species.  We presented love.”  – ER

7 Homicides in Chicago (post 2 of 5).

“A few details of the 500+ rocks that my art students and I painted for Love After Homicide (our installation in Millennium Park, Chicago).  On the front of each rock was a painting; on the back of each the name of a Chicago murder victim (January 2014 – May 2015).  Every rock was traded with the public for an act of kindness.  Most participants couldn’t believe Chicago was the sight of 500+ homicides in just seventeen months.”  – ER

Love After Homicide (post 1 of 5).

Love After Homicide was this year’s art installation.  My art students and I transformed Chicago murders into resonating acts of love.  The installation was set up and run entirely by the students in Chicago’s Millennium Park on June 2.  We brought over 500 rocks, each painted as a memorial for a Chicago murder victim (from January 2014 to March of 2015).  These were set out and the public was invited to take a rock in exchange for committing a random act of love.  This was a moving experience for my students and for the participating public.”  – EM