How to illegally hang your work in Detroit

Actually, I don’t know if it’s illegal.  Detroit is a public-communications headquarters.  In the barren and even the not-so-barren places, hundreds of people seem to always be saying, “I’m here.”

3 Collaborators Wanted

It’s my goal to orchestra “small moment shows” in cities and local environments across North America.  3 collaborators interested in participating in this art activity should contact me for details.  I will send the first editions of either the golden flag, the golden whale, or both the golden parties pieces from America series (the mailable, unfoldable pieces that appear in this post).  Work is hand-mounted, hand-painted and yours.  In exchange I’m asking that collaborators install and photograph the work in some fitting way.  Logistics arranged through email.  – JM

Thanks Joe! (post 5 of 5)

“Solid documentation of art you hold dear seems important.  Joe’s been working on a series of “unfoldables” and he used the process to create five pieces of unfoldable art documenting Love After Homicide, the Millennium Park art installation I completed with my students.  Presented here are photographs of Joe explaining unfoldables and shots of the five documentary pieces he created.  Thanks Joe!”  – EM

Canvas in Progress (post 4 of 5)

“Knowing the public would take all of the 500+ Love After Homicide memorial rocks during our Millennium Park installation, my art students and I reproduced identical two-dimensional versions of every rock on a 4′ x 5′ canvas.  Shown is what we finished on the canvas during the school year.  I brought the canvas home and this summer – during my 2 month break – I’m going to paint the background.  I’ll post images of the finished canvas by August.”  – EM

And the Public Participates (post 3 of 5).

“This 48 image post is an online gallery of people interacting with Love After Homicide and taking the memorial rocks.  Also included is a hug from an inspired visitor, a retired policeman from London, and a visit from park security (we never asked for permission, rather we just showed up and installed our work near Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate).  We not only presented memorials for those who were recently murdered in Chicago; we also encouraged people to think about the need to reduce the large numbers of deaths inflicted by members of our species on other members of our species.  We presented love.”  – ER

7 Homicides in Chicago (post 2 of 5).

“A few details of the 500+ rocks that my art students and I painted for Love After Homicide (our installation in Millennium Park, Chicago).  On the front of each rock was a painting; on the back of each the name of a Chicago murder victim (January 2014 – May 2015).  Every rock was traded with the public for an act of kindness.  Most participants couldn’t believe Chicago was the sight of 500+ homicides in just seventeen months.”  – ER

Love After Homicide (post 1 of 5).

Love After Homicide was this year’s art installation.  My art students and I transformed Chicago murders into resonating acts of love.  The installation was set up and run entirely by the students in Chicago’s Millennium Park on June 2.  We brought over 500 rocks, each painted as a memorial for a Chicago murder victim (from January 2014 to March of 2015).  These were set out and the public was invited to take a rock in exchange for committing a random act of love.  This was a moving experience for my students and for the participating public.”  – EM

“Ten Mary Adam.” East End, London

“Ten Mary Adam” in context with a specific site in London.  Site-specific installations are a means of showing ones work when there’s not a gallery or museum pounding on the door asking to display it themselves.  Site-specific installations require field trips from the studio or kitchen table into the wider world.  Do you ask for permission, or forgiveness, when selecting your site?  My rule: “Oh sorry, please forgive me.”  When I post work at a site, photograph it, and then remove it, the audience becomes individuals who later view photographs of the installation.  When work’s left behind, the audience tends to discover it’s fastened only with thumbtacks, and the work is taken.  Cheers to my nameless collectors.  – JM

On “site-specific installations.”

These archived photographs are from 2006.  That’s about the time I started taking my work into the field to see it installed in specific settings.  I’m in the process of beginning a new series of site-specific installations.  * The first photograph shows a heavy framed piece in a creek – suspended on a tilted stake driven into loose sand and pebbles. That seems risky to me now.  – JM