Our New Business Card – designed by some orphaned Australian kids

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We held our annual “Design Our Business Card” contest and we’re proud to share this year’s winning design.  The artists were some Australian orphans.  For their winning entry, they hired a professional photographer to capture them illegally posting an original Joe Moma Unfoldable in a Sydney, Australia strip mall.  Along with having their photograph on our business card this year, they also received $10 USD and a certificate.  Please join us in congratulating them!

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Campaign Cycles

I’m continuing to work on Unfoldables – they are made by arranging and gluing 16 photocopies onto single, large sheets of paper.  Certain areas are then painted.  Here I’m exploring an antithesis to the avalanche of campaigning that will undoubtedly inundate our lives through late 2016.  – JM

Previous paintings

I recently traveled back in time, via an external hard drive, and found forgotten caches of old work (in the form of digital images).  These 3 paintings are Eur’s and the first 2 were completed before we met.  She used thickener to build surfaces onto the canvas so that you could run your hand over the finished pieces and they felt like topographical maps.  – JM

3.  Shell 4.  Green Dragonflies 5.  Blue Dragonflies

How to illegally hang your work in Detroit

Actually, I don’t know if it’s illegal.  Detroit is a public-communications headquarters.  In the barren and even the not-so-barren places, hundreds of people seem to always be saying, “I’m here.”

3 more solo shows in Detroit

Artists: if you want to show your work, simply bring your work into public and show it.  Here are 3 more solo shows I completed in Detroit this past week.  1…at fancy vegetarian restaurant Seva (Diego #1 and fat frog #1 (ode to Diego) in the bar area).  2…at homey Traffic Jam and Snug (fat frog #2 (ode to Diego) is currently posted on their wall).  3…at independent Source Booksellers (Golden Parties from the America series hung inside, facing the sidewalk viewer).  In all, we showed and left 21 pieces in Detroit.  – JM

Diego’s industrial people – Rivera Court, Detroit Institute of Arts

We saw the Diego and Frida exhibit at Detroit’s DIA.  For two educationally rich hours I got to study Rivera’s canvases and charcoal studies.  Everything had to be committed to memory as there was no photography – not even sketching – allowed in the exhibit, so I kept my nose as close to his works as the environment would allow.  Then we exited through the gift shop and wandered a course to Rivera Court – where Diego’s bigger than life Detroit Industry fresco exists.  It’s flooring.  If you admire even one single thing about large works on walls, then you must make it a point in your life to see Rivera Court (I felt similar awe seeing the Lincoln Monument at night a few years ago).  Rivera Court is not a place for photography – capturing it is not possible.  We stayed in the court for over an hour and visited it again before leaving the museum, being there compressed by our individual responses to such an artistically overwhelming place.  I love to look for the artist at work whenever I see work in person, and I found Diego’s pencil lines apparent everywhere in the muted industrial storyboards visible at eye level (images inspired by what Rivera observed at Ford’s River Rouge Complex).  Capturing the small images shown here was the only effective way I could capture any of Rivera Court.  It’s given me new artistic material to reflect upon when creating my own work.  – JM

3 Diegos for Detroit

3 unfoldable Diego’s.  Going with us to Detroit.  We’re bringing and leaving 21 unfoldables in all.  I hope people who get the unfoldables will be inspired to hang, photograph, and email.  The unfoldables break bread at the table of modern art.  – JM